Roberts, Dale

Born 1959 in Waterville NY, I attended Waterville Central High School and graduated in 1977. At Rochester Institute of Technology, I studied foundation art and majored in painting and drawing. During my sophomore year, a faculty member recommended I study painting in RIT’s graduate program along with the required sophomore schedule.

After obtaining my Associates degree in 1978 from RIT I then transferred to the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, continuing as a fine arts major. In 1981 I earned my BFA in painting with Cum Laude honors. I also received the prestigious Rohm and Haas Purchase Prize for excellence in painting.

Following graduation, I taught art for more than 15 years at various levels. At a Philadelphia private school I was chair of the fine arts department and instructor for grades 7-12. I later taught at Arcadia University as an adjunct professor in drawing and painting. Several of my students continue to win prizes and show at notable fine art galleries in Scottsdale, the U.S. and abroad.

​​​My exhibition record includes many juried shows and several national competitions. Galleries from Philadelphia, New York, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Arizona and Atlanta have handled my work with numerous one-person shows. I’ve also participated in juried museum exhibitions around the country. My work is in many public and private collections in the U.S., Canada and London. I was a Fine Arts Juror for the Pennsylvania Governor’s School for the Arts and was the subject of a Public television documentary in 2002. 

I have participated in multiple panel discussions related to encaustic painting and have delivered museum lectures on related subjects.

I reside with my family near Philadelphia, where I maintain my studio.

Visit his website here

And videos here

Johns, Jasper

Jasper Johns (born May 15, 1930) is an American painter, sculptor and printmaker whose work is associated with abstract expressionism, Neo-Dada, and pop art.

Jasper Johns’s groundbreaking 1958 installation at the Leo Castelli Gallery of his famous target and flag works changed the current of New York painting and had an extraordinary impact on contemporary art. In the paintings, Johns presents images that move into the realm of objects and wrestle with the validity of representation as a philosophical concept. The targets and flags, in the words of critic Leo Steinberg, were “co-extensive” with their canvases, existing somewhere between a symbol and a thing in the world. Not only did these paintings begin Johns’s successful dismantling of modern art through his ironic analysis of structures and rituals, but they also became the innovative new ground on which a generation of painters and sculptors made their work. Johns’s own career spans from the flags, through the device motif in the early 1960s, into the crosshatch paintings of the 1970s, and to his complex, densely layered recent works.

“One night I dreamed that I painted a large American flag,” Johns has said of this work, “and the next morning I got up and I went out and bought the materials to begin it.” Those materials included three canvases that he mounted on plywood, strips of newspaper, and encaustic paint—a mixture of pigment and molten wax that has formed a surface of lumps and smears. The newspaper scraps visible beneath the stripes and forty-eight stars lend this icon historical specificity. The American flag is something “the mind already knows,” Johns has said, but its execution complicates the representation and invites close inspection. A critic of the time encapsulated this painting’s ambivalence, asking, “Is this a flag or a painting?”

As Johns explained it, encaustic allowed him to be more efficient and, at the same time, more deliberate in his gestures. In other words, because pigmented wax sets quickly, Johns could add another mark or strip of saturated paper or cloth with the assurance that any previously laid marks would remain unaffected. In this way, each discrete trace was preserved, effectively embalmed.

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Roberts, Verity

Verity paints primarily in encaustic. Originally self-taught in encaustic, over the last decade Verity has attended and participated in numerous workshops, exhibitions and encaustic conferences in the US. Her earlier career was as a film set decorator.

Verity has further adapted the encaustic process, adding media such as wax pencils, digital print transfers and inks. This extraordinarily versatile medium enables the artist to exploit both the opaque and transparent qualities of the wax by layering it – this being a particular feature of the encaustic process. Whether smooth and translucent or thickly textural, the wax forms an emotionally charged surface.

Her inspiration derives from her travels – her travelscapes – recollections both vivid and allusive are built over time. Each painting with its complex layered surface aims to elicit a response: reshaping its own new history.

She spends time in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico where she is represented by Calderoni Studio in Fábrica La Aurora. She exhibits in Sydney at Art2Muse Gallery and is collected both in Australia and intenationally.

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Dyck, Aganetha

Aganetha Dyck is a Canadian artist who is interested in environmental issues, specifically the power of the small. She is interested in inter species communication. Her research asks questions about the ramifications all living beings would experience should honeybees disappear from earth.

Dyck is using apiary feeder boards and hive blankets to develop her new body of work.

Aganetha Dyck was born in Marquette, Manitoba in 1937 and was raised in a Mennonite community. She moved with her husband and children to Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, in 1972, where she began to take courses at local art centres. From 1974 to 1976 she continued to raise her family while attending Prince Albert Community College in Saskatchewan. Moving her family back to Winnipeg in 1976, she worked on her art and later furthered her study of art history at the University of Winnipeg from 1980 to 1982.

Dyck’s early work is described as transforming domestic processes into fine art, thereby validating activities that are traditionally considered feminine. In her early work, Dyck used household materials such as buttons, wool fabrics, and cigarettes. A Winnipeg Art Gallery exhibition of Dyck’s work featured several hundred jars of buttons prepared and cooked using different culinary techniques.

Dyck is best known for her work with live honeybees, who she collaborated with between 1991 to 2010. Dyck placed interesting objects into beehives, or beehives into objects, and allowed the bees to build honeycomb on the objects, sometimes over the course of years. Her interest is in the inter-communication between species and would direct the bees to make their honeycomb marks on the objects by painting with perfumes and pheromones.

Dyck is well known for her transformation of commonplace objects such as shoes, buttons and figurines into things which are simultaneously metaphysical, delicate and sometime humorous. She shows us that the “exotic” can be found in the most mundane and everyday of things, if one examines them with an open mind. In one sense, she doesn’t transform an object as much as she liberates objects from familiar contexts, thus imbuing them with greater meaning. Her work is about ideas and thoughts, yet it always remains accessible and alluring to the viewer.

Dyck won the Governor General’s Award in Visual Arts and the Manitoba Arts Council Arts Award of Distinction in 2007.

Her work has been exhibited in galleries and museums across Canada and in England, France and the Netherlands. Her work can be found in the collections of such prestigious museums as the National Gallery of Canada, the Glenbow Museum, the Vancouver Art Gallery and the Yorkshire Sculpture Park in Britain.

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Libertiny, Tomas Gabzdil

TOMÁŠ GABZDIL LIBERTÍNY (1979)

Currently living and working in Rotterdam, through his art, Tomáš Libertíny continually explores the beauty and intelligence of nature as well as probing into the existential questions of the human mind.

Born in Slovakia, son of an architect and a historian, he studied at the Technical University Košice in Slovakia focusing on engineering and design. He was awarded George Soros’s Open Society Institute Scholarship to study at The University of Washington in Seattle, where he focused on painting and sculpture. He continued his study at the Academy of Fine Arts and Design in Bratislava in painting and conceptual design. After receiving the prestigious Huygens Scholarship, he enrolled in the Masters program at the Design Academy Eindhoven where he received his MFA in 2006.

WORK

Libertiny’s fascination with the beauty and intelligence of nature fuels his work with timeless yet relatable emotions. The relationship between Man & Nature, both psychological and physical, serves as a constant source of inspiration.

While embracing today’s advanced methods of design and latest technology to explore and realise his art the works are still marked by the hand of the artist. His use of industrial precision is merely “a means to an end” which enables him to set-up conditions for controlled randomness. His awareness of patterns and repetitions that surround us as well as mesmerising imperfections in nature are at the formal core of his drawings, paintings and sculptural work. Between the lines, he seeks to offer a hint of an answer to the probing existencial questions.

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Brimicombe, Dawn

The Jurassic Coast remade in hot wax, it’s possible that Dawn Brimicombe has hit upon a brilliant combination.  Her methods and materials have an affinity with her subject – cliffs and stones and mud and sand can be shaped oddly and worked upon and so can encaustic was medium (filtered beeswax and damar resin) – which Dawn heats and fuses and scrapes and cuts – and her works also carry the glow of happy memories – like pebbles that stay wet and sparkling in the sun.

Dawn has exhibited widely across the UK over the years including group exhibitions at the OXO Gallery and the Cork Street Gallery in London, she continues to work from her Studio on the East Devon/Dorset borders where she is constantly inspired by the sea, the natural world, organic formations, colour, line & texture.

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Tormey, Alicia

She is one of the best encaustic painters and resides in Seattle, Washington .

Alicia Tormey is best known for her organic imagery and inventive techniques that involve a blend of bees wax, resin, shellac and raw pigments.

Wielding a blow torch, Tormey cultivates these materials into ethereal images of distant landscapes, waterways and explosive flora.

Alicia’s work has been featured on the cover of Professional Artist Magazine and in numerous other publications including Encaustic Arts Magazine and Studio Visit Magazine.

She is the recipient of a Grant for Artists Projects (GAP) award from Artist Trust and her works have been included in numerous exhibitions and public collections throughout the United States and abroad.

Tormey was recently invited by the U.S. State Department to exhibit her work in the American Embassy in Tashkent, Uzbekistan.

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Starting up

Hi, I’m Susana F. Blanco, an artist and researcher based in Saudi Arabia.

I am currently researching and writing up my dissertation to get my International PhD in Fine Arts.

The thesis topic is:
“The BEESWAX used as material in Arts and its applications from the 20th century to the present”.

I would like to publish here all the data collected to share, not only with the research collective but with everybody.

I think that beeswax is a wonderful unknown gem that many people do not know yet and I will try to discover it to you here.

I also work at the Prince Mohammad Bin Fahd University (Graphic Design Department) and, when I show this new technique to my students , they love it.

I will write the thesis in Spanish because I am from Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), Spain. Anyway, here I will share it in English because it is the most universal language.

Please, do not hesitate to ask, comment and even provide new information because this will be very useful for my work. I would really appreciate this 🙂

I will also share my practical research with my encaustic paintings here:(www.susanafblanco.com)

I hope you enjoy it as much as I do. Also that it will be useful that you share it with others because this is the main purpose of my work:
sharing valuable information.

Thank you!

Hi, I’m Susana F. Blanco, an artist and researcher.
I am currently collecting data and writing up my dissertation to get my International PhD in Fine Arts.

The main topic of my thesis is as follows:
“The BEESWAX used as material in Arts and its applications from the 20th century to the present”.

I would like to publish here all the data collected to share, not only with the researches collective but with everybody.

I think that beeswax is a wonderful unknown gem that many people do not know yet and I will try to discover it to you here.

I also work at the Prince Mohammad Bin Fahd University (Interior Design Department) and, when I show this new technique to my students , they are fascinated.

I will write the thesis in Spanish because I am from Fine Arts University Complutense of Madrid (UCM), Spain. Anyway, here I will share it in English because it is the most universal language.

Please, do not hesitate to ask, comment and even provide new information because this will be very useful for my work. I would really appreciate this 🙂

I will also share my practical research with my encaustic paintings here:(www.susanafblanco.com)

I hope you enjoy it as much as I do. Also that it will be useful that you share it with others because this is the main purpose of my work:
sharing valuable information.

Thank you!